Public Eyesore

Besides Hay (voice, flute, piccolo, piano, electronics) and Fernandes (percussion, field recordings, electronics), the musicians involved are Lisle Ellis, Ellen Weller and Al Scholl, who variously contribute bass, sax, flute, guitar and electronics. Two major elements characterize the music: Hay’s voice – often similar to Shelley Hirsch’s but even more malleable and unpredictable – and the utter absence of “style”, which is made easier by the often pulseless approach of Fernandes, who’s more interested in electronic soundscapes and fractured decompositions of barely existent metres than in churning out regular rhythms. The duo’s imagination produces instant visions and moments of mystery in “Belly Of The Craft”, while a track like “Away From The Doom” is downright exhilarating, the scenario continuously shifting between third-rate horror movie soundtrack and a miniature replica of Diamanda Galàs engaged in some kind of recreational activity. “Spar” is a splendid example of creative improvisation animated by clever electronics; on the other hand, the following “Wicked Child” is so complex that it sounds computer-generated. The two movements of the title track open and close the album, symbols of the irrepressible urge towards unadulterated spiritual freedom that the whole CD constantly manifests. High-quality stuff from every point of view.

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